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Final Destination: How Not to Crash While Driving Your Car

It is widely understood that stress impairs a driver’s ability to operate a vehicle. Understand the who, what, and where to avoid on the road.

Final Destination: How Not to Crash While Driving Your Car

Our friends at CarJoJo listed out several tips on how to drive as safely as possible, and when to avoid getting behind the wheel.

Don't Stress Out

Stress-prone drivers going through heated arguments with a coworker or a spouse have less situational awareness. Their attention is being delegated elsewhere and their mind is less focused on the task at hand, in this case driving.

If you're feeling stressed, overwhelmed, or your mind is preoccupied on something other than the road, try to relax before getting behind the wheel.

You Snooze You Lose

There is a direct correlation between sleep deprivation and the increased risk for affected individuals to be involved in a car accident, according to a report by the AAA Foundation.

· 7% of all crashes involve driver drowsiness
· 13% of crashes that result in hospital admission involve driver drowsiness
· 21% of fatal crashes involve driver drowsiness

The AAA Foundation report includes the results of 7,234 drivers involved in 4,571 crashes.

Of which they found:

Drivers Who Sleep 4 Hours Or LessDrivers Who Sleep 4-5 HoursDrivers Who Sleep 5-6 HoursDrivers Who Sleep 6-7 Hours
11.5x the crash rate of drivers who sleep for 7+ hours4.3x the crash rate of drivers who sleep for 7+ hours1.9x the crash rate of drivers who sleep for 7+ hours1.3x the crash rate of drivers who sleep for 7+ hours
Drivers Who Slept 1-2 Hours Less Than UsualDrivers Who Slept 2-3 Hours Less Than UsualDrivers Who Slept 3-4 Hours Less Than UsualDrivers Who Slept 4+ Hours Less Than Usual
1.3x the crash rate of drivers who slept their usual amount3.0x the crash rate of drivers who slept their usual amount2.1x the crash rate of drivers who slept their usual amount10.2x the crash rate of drivers who slept their usual amount

Distracted Driving

Distracted drivers attempting to multitask by plugging information into their GPS or texting while driving, are also at an increased risk of getting into accidents. Yet people still do these things while driving, the most frequent offenders being millennials.

Another report by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety explicitly states:

Texting While Driving

· Drivers ages 19-24 were 1.6 times as likely as all drivers to report having read a text message or e-mail while driving in the last 30 days (66.1 percent vs. 40.2 percent).
· Drivers ages 19-24 were nearly twice as likely as all drivers to report having typed or sent a text message or e-mail while driving (59.3 percent vs. 31.4 percent).

Speeding

· Drivers ages 19-24 were 1.4 times as likely as all drivers to report having driven 10 mph over the speed limit on a residential street.
· Nearly 12 percent of drivers ages 19-24 reported feeling that it is acceptable to drive 10 mph over the speed limit in a school zone, compared to less than 5 percent of all drivers.

Running a Red-Light

· Nearly 50% of drivers ages 19-24 reported driving through a light that had just turned red when they could have stopped safely, compared to 36% of all drivers.
· Nearly 14% of drivers ages 19-24 reported feeling that it is acceptable to drive through a light that just turned red, when they could have stopped safely, compared to about 6% of all drivers.

In the last 30 days, 88.4% of drivers aged 19-24 reported speeding, running a red light, or texting while driving, which was nearly 10% more than the next highest age group, who were partaking in the same types of activities while driving (drivers 25-39 at 79.2%).

Dangerous Roads to Drive On

There are other instances where you might be at the wrong place at the wrong time, and when it comes to driving in these cities that happens most of the time. Allstate's annual “America’s Best Drivers Report” was created to highlight U.S. cities that are home to the safest drivers in the country. By virtue, it also illustrates which cities are the least safe to drive in.

Top 25 U.S. Cities with the Worst Drivers

2016 Worst Drivers Report RankingCityAverage Years Between CollisionRelative Collision Likelihood
1Boston, MA3.7167.6%
2Worcester, MA4.5124.4%
3Baltimore, MD4.7113.7%
4Washington, D.C.4.9106.2%
5Springfield, MA5.776.7%
6Glendale, CA5.871.3%
7Providence, RI5.969.1%
8Los Angeles, CA6.358.8%
9Philadelphia, PA6.357.8%
10San Francisco, CA6.651.7%
11New Haven, CT6.651.3%
12Alexandria, VA6.750.3%
13Fullerton, CA6.846.9%
14Garden Grove, CA6.846.6%
15Oakland, CA6.944.4%
16Bridgeport, CA7.042.3%
17Atlanta, GA7.140.7%
18Seattle, WA7.140.4%
19Garland, TX7.239.1%
20Portland, OR7.239.0%
21Dallas, TX7.337.5%
22Torrance, CA7.336.9%
23Pittsburgh, PA7.435.9%
24Anaheim, CA7.434.9%
25Baton Rouge, LA7.434.5%

Source: Allstate's 2016 “America’s Best Drivers Report”

The state holding 9 of the top 25 most dangerous cities to drive in is California. Conversely, the city with the safest drivers according to Allstate is Brownsville, TX. In fact, Texas is home to 3 of the top 12 safest cities to drive in.

Bringing it Home

These days there are safety features drivers can invest in to protect themselves from their own driving, and from those around them including lane assist warnings, backup cameras, and front crash warnings.

Our advice is to find a safe car, don't drive when tired or distracted, and if you’re moving, choose a city where travel safety ratings are high.

Driving Tips
Safety Tips
The Instamotor TeamThe Instamotor Team

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